ilivetodayav

The High Deserts Social Network Blog…

Summer Light Specials

Bocca Taco Salad
Garden Salad, Seasoned Ground Bocca PattyPinto and Red Beans, Corn, Cheese, Onion, Tomato, and Tortilla Strips 10
Chicken Caesar Salad or Wrap it UP!
Romaine, Grilled Chicken marinated in Caesar Dressing,Fresh Parmesan CheeseAnd for an interesting twist – tortilla strips 10
(If you prefer you can request croutons but Sharon says it’s better this way!)
Greek Feta Salad
Lemon Breast of Chicken, Romaine, Olives, Red Bell Peppers, Cucumbers, Red Onions, Tomato, and FetaCheese 10 (If you looking for a healthy salad with tons of flavor and doesn’t need the added calories ofdressing this is your choice—says Sharon)
Bruschetta Chicken Salad
Romaine, Chicken Breast marinated in light balsamicTopped with our Signature Bruschetta, drizzled with our Balsamic Reduction, Mozzarella Cheese, BlackOlivesAnd Sprinkled with Fresh Parmesan 11
Southwestern Chicken Wrap it UP!
Romaine, Chipotle Chicken, drizzled with Chipotle Ranch, Pinto and Red Beans, Corn, Fresh Cilantro Jackand Cheddar Cheese 11
Turkey, Apples, Walnut and Cranberry Salad
Mixed Greens, Turkey, Apples, Walnuts and Cranberries and Feta Cheese served with a RaspberryVinaigrette 11
Recipes Straight FromGrandma Giannini’s Kitchen
Walnut and Olive Sandwich on Wheat
Diced Walnuts and Olive Salad, Mayo, Lettuce and Tomato 8
Bistro Chicken Salad Sandwich
Chopped Breast of Chicken, Cranberries, Celery, and Walnuts

August 4, 2011 Posted by | blvd dining, Lancaster BLVD dining, lancaster dining, lancaster dinner, Lancaster Italian restaurant | , , , | Leave a comment

Aviation workers deal with politics-induced furloughs

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney) — Some 4,000 furloughed aviation workers are the latest casualty of political infighting in Washington.

Families used to making $75,000 a year are filing for unemployment benefits and worrying how to make mortgage, car and student loan payments, furloughed workers say.

“It really is scary,” said Michael MacDonald, a 54-year-old Federal Aviation Administration engineer who lives outside of Boston. “For one week, you think OK, we can handle one week. But now the reality is starting to set in — this is going to take six weeks or more.”

The FAA has been partially shut down for more than a week, with only air traffic controllers, mechanics and those integral to keeping planes flying safely on the job.

The plight of 4,000 FAA workers has been overshadowed by greater commotion over raising the debt limit and spending cuts. But lawmakers have also been at odds over approving a routine stop-gap funding measure for the agency.

With the House adjourned, the funding impasse will likely grind on for FAA employees who are feeling the pinch of a lack of paycheck, not to mention perks such as like 401(k) retirement benefit contributions.

MacDonald works on updating communications systems for the FAA. He’s worried about paying his mortgage, car loans and college tuition for his two kids. He filed for unemployment benefits last week and has been urging his colleagues to do the same.

“I’ve never been in this situation before,” said MacDonald, a 20-year veteran of the FAA.

While many employees, especially single parents, are terrified of spiraling into debt, other FAA workers say they’re just furious that they’ve become the victims of partisan wrangling in Washington.

“For this to be about something so petty, it’s ridiculous. And terribly arrogant and totally uncaring,” said Steve Alexander, 59, who lives near Sanford, N.C.

Alexander’s last day on the job was July 22, when he finished upgrading the landing system at Memphis International Airport.

While Alexander saved up over a year to withstand this furlough, as a union representative, he has been talking to panicked colleagues who can’t afford to be out of work for weeks on end.

The partial shutdown impacts more than just federal workers. The FAA had to stop hundreds of airport construction projects nationwide, which means some 24,000 construction workers are also out of work. Another 35,000 support workers, such as food service vendors, are also impacted, said Steve Sandherr CEO of the Associated General Contractors of America.

http://i.cdn.turner.com/money/.element/apps/cvp/4.0/swf/cnn_money_384x216_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=/video/news/2011/04/26/n_southwest_air_traffic.cnnmoney

“This can’t go on a day longer, much less six weeks longer,” Randy Babbitt, administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, told CNN on Tuesday

— CNN’s Mike M. Ahlers contributed to this report. To top of page

August 4, 2011 Posted by | aviation, aviation engineering government, engineering services, federal aviation, Federal Aviation Administration, professional services | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Congress hits beach, aviation workers hit unemployment lines

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/apps/cvp/3.0/swf/cnn_416x234_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=politics/2011/08/03/tsr.rowlands.faa.funding.cnn

(CNN) — Neil Bolen has worked as a civil engineer with the Federal Aviation Administration for the past 24 years, designing air traffic control radar systems that help keep America moving.

Now he’s got a message for Congress: Get moving on a plan to save his job.

Bolen, a 48-year-old father of two from the Atlanta area, is one of thousands of Americans with ties to the aviation industry who are suddenly finding themselves out of work this summer because of Congress’s failure to pass routine legislation keeping the FAA funded. The House and Senate have gone on vacation, leaving Bolen on furlough.

He’s had no choice but to file for unemployment, prioritize which bills to pay, and dig into his family’s savings in order to make ends meet.

“Congress doesn’t care about me at all,” Bolen told CNN. “They’re not done with their work and they go on vacation. How do they do that?”

Bolen says he’s tried to “avoid politics as a rule” his whole life, but now he’s calling his congressman and senators — to no avail.

“It’s always somebody else’s fault” when you call their offices, he says. “It’s never our fault.”

The House adjourned Monday after a divisive vote to raise the national debt ceiling, leaving the Senate with an FAA funding extension bill it did not like and could not amend. So the Senate recessed Tuesday night without doing anything.

At issue is a decision by Rep. John Mica, a Florida Republican, to add a provision to the funding extension cutting subsidies to rural airports. The measure is opposed by powerful Democrats such as Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada.

There’s also a dispute over provisions that would make it easier for airline employees to unionize. Democrats support the section; Republicans generally oppose it.

Bolen and 4,000 other FAA employees are stuck in the middle of the dispute. But they’re not the only people being hurt. The FAA has stopped hundreds of airport construction projects nationwide, putting about 24,000 construction workers out of work.

Another 35,000 support workers, such as food service vendors, are also affected, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

The FAA says the impasse will also prevent the federal government from collecting approximately $200 million a week in airline passenger taxes — or about $1.2 billion during the congressional recess.

Other workers caught up in the mess share Bolen’s frustrating and growing anger with Congress.

“We’re into the politics of confrontation versus looking out for the interests for constituents,” said Troy Swanberg, a mechanical engineer from Chicago. “I’m really disappointed.”

He called the situation “unconscionable.”

Swanberg, 42, has worked for the FAA for 20 years and has a 2-year-old daughter. Like Bolen, he’s digging into his savings. He’s also looking for another job.

Robert Aitken, 47, works for the FAA in Burlington, Massachusetts. He’s been with the FAA for 18 years, and before that spent five years in the Navy. He has two children, ages 9 and 12.

“We’re just in shock that (Congress) actually did not get this done,” he told CNN. “We understand this is politics, but this is just insane.”

Aitken said he’s “very upset” Congress “didn’t think this was important enough to stick around for.” He stressed that it’s not just federal workers who are being hurt by the latest Washington stalemate.

“They’re going to put people out of business,” he warned. “Small companies will go under.”

Curtis Howe, 50, works for the FAA in Seattle. He helped build the control tower at nearby Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, among other things.

Recently, he and his wife took out a 15-year home equity loan in order to put a new roof on their house. Now he’s being forced to use that money to pay his regular bills.

“It’s almost like there’s a … dog walking down the road, and he picked up a hand grenade in his mouth and it’s going to go off. They don’t even know what they’re doing,” he said in reference to Congress. “Who are they? Are they better than us?”

“This is a clear attack on middle America,” Howe said. “This is a punch in the face. It’s terrible.”

 

 

 

August 4, 2011 Posted by | SDVOSB | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Best of “The Boss” as The Rising Plays Springsteen at Palmdale Amphitheater

PALMDALE – Performing songs spanning the nearly five decades of Bruce Springsteen’s catalogue, from Greetings From Asbury Park through the 2009 release Working On A Dream, The Rising will bring all the same power, heart and soul as “The Boss” & The E Street Band with a house-rocking, earth-shaking, heart-stopping tribute at the Palmdale Amphitheater this Saturday, Aug. 6 at 8 pm as part of the City of Palmdale’s Starlight Concert Series.

Admission is $5 for age 13 and older; guests 12 and younger are admitted free, and parking is free.

The Rising will perform a string of red-hot hits like “Born in the U.S.A.,” “Glory Days” and “Hungry Heart.”

A brotherhood of friends, some with ties that date back nearly two decades, The Rising takes the stage more like a gang than a band, much like Springsteen & The E Street Band. They collectively roll up their sleeves and go to work, night after night. They were all cut from the worn denim of blue-collar towns, and paid musical dues playing dive bars and juke joints. What you hear is the musical truth. What you see is the embodiment of friendship, and what you feel is the “spiritual healing” that can only be supplied by a great rock ’n’ roll band.

“The Rising does not pretend,” said Palmdale’s Communications Manager John Mlynar. “Their passion and talent are real. There are no prerecorded tracks or pretend playing. There is no make-up or make believe voices. The band uses all of its collective power to hold true to the artistic vision, to both honor the artist and the fans.”

In addition to enjoying the best of Bruce Springsteen, Starlight Concert goers will also have an opportunity to win a solar powered backpack for recycling at the concert.

“Waste Management and the City of Palmdale are partnering for ‘Recycling Rocks,’ a promotion to get the word out about recycling,’” said Palmdale’s Sponsorship and Marketing Specialist Stella Knight. “We’ll be looking for people who are properly separating their trash and recyclables, and if we catch you, we’ll reward you with a solar backpack that can charge a laptop, cell phone, camera or MP3 player, courtesy of Waste Management.” The solar backpacks retail for $100.

In addition to Waste Management, the Antelope Valley Mall will be distributing American flags to the first 750 concertgoers through the gate. Guests can gather family and friends for a free photograph, courtesy of Antelope Valley Mall, at the main gate, and receive free giveaways from Valleywide Dental. 

The Starlight Concert Series closes with a performance by Garth Guy Live! on Saturday, Aug.13. Dean Simmons gives a dead-on “Garth” performance, nailing the walk, the talk, the laugh and Garth’s talent for truly entertaining his audiences while performing fan favorites like “Friends in Low Places,” “The Thunder Rolls” and “The Dance.” The first 200 children age 12 and under through the gates at the Garth Guy Live! concert will receive a free straw cowboy hat, courtesy of the Antelope Valley Mall.

Tickets for all Starlight concerts are on sale now at the parks and recreation office and Palmdale Oasis Park Recreation Center. The parks and recreation office, 38260 10th St. East, is open Monday through Thursday, 7:30 am to 6 pm, and accepts cash, check, Mastercard and Visa. The Palmdale Oasis Park Recreation Center, 3850 East Avenue S, is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 3:30-8 pm, and Wednesday, 3:30-6:30 pm. The recreation center accepts check, Mastercard or Visa.

The Palmdale Amphitheater is located at 2723 Rancho Vista Boulevard. All concerts begin at 8 pm, and gates open at 6 pm. Guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets. Carry-in food, beverages, coolers, alcohol and pets are not permitted. Food will be available for purchase.

The Starlight Concert Series is generously sponsored by premier sponsors American Medical Response, Antelope Valley Mall, High Desert Medical Group, Palmdale Regional Medical Center, PARS Fine Persian Cuisine, Robertson’s Palmdale Honda, Valleywide Dental – Dr. Robert Haze & Associates, Southern California Edison, and Waste Management; and contributing sponsors 93.5 The Quake, Anheuser-Busch Sales, AT&T The Real Yellow Pages, Classic Top 40 106.9, Double D Cupcakes, Greenhouse Café, Lancaster JetHawks, Residence Inn – Palmdale, Round Table Pizza and The Palmdale Hotel.

For more information about the upcoming Starlight Concert Series, please call parks and recreation at 661/267-5611.

August 4, 2011 Posted by | City of Palmdale, palmdale, palmdale news, palmdale press | , , , | Leave a comment