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Meet Nicole Hartman…Drones are Here to stay.

An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), also known as a unmanned aircraft system (UAS), remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) or unmanned aircraft, is a machine which functions either by the remote control of a navigator or pilot (called a Combat Systems Officer on UCAVs) or autonomously, that is, as a self-directing entity. Their largest use is within military applications. To distinguish UAVs from missiles, a UAV is defined as a “powered, aerial vehicle that does not carry a human operator, uses aerodynamic forces to provide veh

icle lift, can fly autonomously or be piloted remotely, can be expendable or recoverable, and can carry a lethal or nonlethal payload”.[1] 

Group_photo_of_aerial_demonstrators_at_the_2005_naval_unmanned_aerial_vehicle_air_demo

Therefore, cruise missiles are not considered UAVs, because, like many other guided missiles, the vehicle itself is a weapon that is not reused, even though it is also unmanned and in some cases remotely guided. There are a wide variety of UAV shapes, sizes, configurations, and characteristics. Historically, UAVs were simple drones[2] (remotely piloted aircraft), but autonomous control is increasingly being employed in UAVs. UAVs come in two varieties: some are controlled from a remote location (which may even be many thousands of kilometers away, on another continent), and others fly autonomously based on pre-programmed flight plans using more complex dynamic automation systems. Currently, military UAVs perform reconnaissance as well as attack missions.[3] While many successful drone attacks on militants have been reported, they have a reputation of being prone to collateral damage and/or erroneous targeting, as with many other weapon types.[2] UAVs are also used in a small but growing number of civil applications, such as firefighting or nonmilitary security work, such as surveillance of pipelines. UAVs are often preferred for missions that are too “dull, dirty, or dangerous” for manned aircraft.

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November 22, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), SDB, SDVOSB | Leave a comment

Final Regulations Will Strengthen 8(a) Business Development Program for Small Businesses

Friday, February 11, 2011
11-12
Tiffani Clements (202) 401-0035

 

 

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Small Business Administration today published a package of final rules that will revise regulations to strengthen its 8(a) Business Development program to better ensure that the benefits flow to the intended recipients and help prevent waste, fraud and abuse.

The rules were published today in The Federal Register and will become effective in 30 days on March 14, 2011.

The revisions are the first comprehensive overhaul of the 8(a) program in more than 10 years. The regulations incorporate technical changes and substantive changes that mirror existing or new legislation enacted since the last revision in June 1998.

“The 8(a) Business Development Program is an effective tool for providing small businesses with support to help them compete for and win federal government contracts, and in turn put them in the best possible position to drive economic growth and create jobs,” SBA Administrator Karen Mills said. “Through public meetings held in cities throughout the country, SBA gained valuable input from members of the small business community on ways to strengthen the program to provide the best opportunities for eligible firms, while also stepping up efforts to combat waste, fraud and abuse.”

The rules cover a variety of areas of the program, ranging from clarifications on determining economic disadvantage to requirements on Joint Ventures and the Mentor-Protégé program. Some of the components of the 8(a) program that the revised regulations will affect include:

  • Joint Ventures – requiring that the 8(a) firm must perform 40 percent of the work of each 8(a) joint venture contract that is awarded, including those awarded under a Mentor/Protégé agreement, to ensure that these companies are able to build capacity;

  • Economic Disadvantage – providing more clarification on factors that determine economic disadvantage as it relates to total assets, gross income, retirement accounts and a spouse of an 8(a) company owner when determining the owner’s ability to access capital and credit;

  • Mentor-Protégé Program – adding consequences for a mentor who does not provide assistance to their protégé, ranging from stop-work orders to debarment

  • Ownership and Control Requirements – providing flexibility on whether to admit 8(a) program companies owned by individuals with immediate family members who are owners of current and former 8(a) participants;

  • Tribally-Owned Firms – requiring firms owned by tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, Native Hawaiian Organizations and Community Development Corporations to report benefits flowing back to their respective communities;

  • Excessive Withdrawals – amending regulations on what amount is considered excessive as a basis for termination or early graduation from the 8(a) program; and

  • Business Size for Primary Industry – requiring that a firm’s size status remain small for its primary industry code during its participation in the 8(a) program.

The SBA initially published the proposed rule on Oct. 28, 2009 and provided a 60-day comment period for the public to submit their comments. Many businesses requested more time, so the SBA extended the comment period an additional 30 days, allowing the public to submit their comments by Jan. 28, 2010. In addition to requesting written comments from the public, the SBA also embarked on a “Listening Tour” and hosted public meetings between December 2009 and January 2010 in 10 cities around the country: Albuquerque, N.M., Atlanta, Ga., Boston, Mass., Chicago, Ill., Dallas, Texas, Los Angeles, Calif., Miami, Fla., New York, N.Y., Seattle, Wash. and Washington, D.C.

The SBA also conducted tribal consultations to gain further public input to the revisions in Albuquerque, Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, and Seattle. In total, the SBA received more than 2,500 individual comments from the public.

The 8(a) program is a nine-year business development program for small businesses where the owner(s) fits the SBA’s criteria of being socially and economically disadvantaged and the same owners control the firm. The 8(a) program helps these firms develop their business and provides them with access to government contracting opportunities, allowing them to become solid competitors in the federal marketplace. It also provides specialized business training, counseling, marketing assistance and high-level executive development to its participants. In FY09, small businesses received $18.6 billion in 8(a) contract dollars.

 

 

John Clancey Don Rhea

 

 

 

 

March 30, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), business development program, SDB, SDVOSB, Small Business Administration | , , , , | Leave a comment

GSA boosts per diem rates in major metro areas

GSA boosts per diem rates in major metro areas

The General Services Administration is raising the travel per diem rates for lodging in some expensive metropolitan areas as of April 1, according to a notice in Tuesday’s Federal Register.

Federal employees on business travel to New York City and San Francisco will see per diem rates for lodging increase between April and September, based on previous estimates for fiscal 2011. The per diem rate for meals and incidental expenses — currently $71 for both areas — will remain the same. The rate change affects all five New York City boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens and Staten Island.

Beginning next month, travelers to New York can spend $212 per day on lodging, an increase from the current rate of $192. That rate increases to $224 in June, and $295 per day in September. San Francisco can spend $150 per day on lodging beginning next month; in September, that rates increases to $180. Currently, the per diem rate for San Francisco County is $142.

GSA, which sets the federal per diem rates, assigns a reimbursement rate higher than the standard to frequently traveled regions considered more expensive. The standard lodging rate, which covers hotels in 2,600 counties nationwide, increased from $70 to $77 in fiscal 2011.

After its fiscal 2011 midyear review, the government also decided to boost lodging rates as of April 1 for the following areas: San Bernardino County in California, which includes the cities of Barstow, Ontario and Victorville; Layette County in Mississippi, where Oxford is located; Harrisburg and Hershey in Pennsylvania’s Dauphin County; Greenville in Texas’s Hunt County, and Bowling Green in Virginia’s Caroline County. The per diem figures for Harrisburg and Hershey increase from $106 to $134 from April through August, but dip back to $107 in September.

Meals and incidental expenses will remain at the current rates, except those for Oxford and Bowling Green, which will see slight increases.

When GSA published per diem rates in August 2010, overall, rates for lodging during the past year decreased in 310 of the 378 nonstandard, mostly metropolitan areas across the country, because of the economic recession. At that time, the reduced rates for nonstandard areas reflected a 5.73 percent drop in the cost of lodging from fiscal 2010, while the fiscal 2011 per diem rates reflected an overall decrease of 3.85 percent when compared with fiscal 2010 rates.

Clarification: The figures GSA released earlier for April through September represent a slight rate boost. For example, GSA’s earlier per diem rate for New York City in September was $269; after the mid-year review it is $295. The original per diem rate for San Francisco in September, for example, was $174; now it is $180.

John Clancey Don Rhea

March 30, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), genreal service administration, sba, SDB, SDVOSB | , , , , | Leave a comment

Government shutdown threatens small businesses

Reliance on contracts, fewer reserves put firms at risk

 

A potential government shutdown has been delayed until mid-March, but that doesn’t mean that government contractors — particularly small businesses — have stopped preparing for the possibility that their biggest customer will close up shop.

While most government contractors will be affected in some way by a government shutdown, it’s thought that small businesses will feel the greatest impact because many rely on the government for all of their annual revenue and have less cash flow and fewer resources.

Several small-business contractors that generate the majority of their revenue from government work are coming up with plans for how to deal with the potential loss of revenue, as well as what to do with scores of employees who can’t do the work they were hired for.

“How do we recover the loss of revenue?” asked Tony Jimenez, president and CEO of MicroTech, a company based in Vienna, Va., that generates 80 percent of its revenue from government contracts. “It’s a constant situation of Democrats and Republicans trying to teach each other a lesson, and government contractors are suffering.”

Small businesses have little to go on in terms of knowing whether and for how long the government will stop working. But they do know that nonessential contracts will stop and the work they do that requires supervision by a government employee will also stop if that government employee has been furloughed.

Ideally, many say they’d like to keep employees on the payroll but can’t do it if the funds aren’t there. So, do the contractor’s employees get furloughed? Are they forced to take their paid vacation time? Are there other projects for them to work on?

One of the biggest fears small businesses face is that good employees, forced to take vacations or get furloughed, might decide to leave.

“If we lose employees, then it’s very hard to bring them back and go through the security clearance process again,” said Jay Challa, chairman and CEO of Ace Info Solutions Inc., based in Reston, Va.

Challa said his firm, which has about 20 government projects active right now, will consider letting employees continue working at government sites that don’t require a government supervisor.

Another option is to allow the employees to take on nongovernment work, such as research projects and proposal writing. Challa said the company will also use the time to make sure employees are caught up on certifications. These measures will allow employees to still be paid and not have to use up any vacation time.

“We will have to use overhead dollars for those tasks,” Challa said. “But we just have to make sure we give the employees enough opportunities to continue.”

If employees aren’t able to work on other company projects, they will be asked to take paid time off, Challa said.

List Innovative Solutions, an IT provider to the federal government based in Herndon, Va., gets all of its revenue from government contracts. So the small firm is seeking legal advice to better understand the human resources laws and how it can deal with its hourly and salaried employees.

The company’s preference is for employees to take their paid vacation time rather than leave without pay. But a furlough is not completely out of the question for List and other small businesses.

“A small business can’t carry a whole lot of it,” said Katie Sleep, president and CEO of List. “We’re trying to keep going and trying not to go into panic mode because it could be in vain. I hope they can work it out to get us through the budget year.”

Aronson LLC, an accounting and consulting firm in Rockville, Md., says the impending government shutdown has been one of its most active blog topics on the firm’s website. Aronson has also been busy consulting with clients on how to handle a government shutdown.

“Treat it as a project,” said Thomas Marcinko, principal consultant with Aronson. “Assign somebody to be in charge or responsible for preparing your firm for a shutdown.”

His other advice includes looking at each contract and evaluating how each one will be affected, as well as telling small businesses to alert their banks about late payments from their clients, document any costs related to the shutdown and communicate with all the people who are affected, including suppliers.

“The shutdown is very complicated and impacts different contracts differently,” Marcinko said. “Handling it well will help a great deal. Not handling it well is close to fatal.”


John Clancey Don Rhea

 

March 21, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), sba, SDB, SDVOSB, Small Business Administration, small business contractor | , , , , , | Leave a comment

ClancyJG International sdb-sdvosb-8a

We have more than three decades of expertise serving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DOD), and private industry.

ClancyJG International is an professional, engineering, and consulting services company.  We are recognized experts in air traffic control and airspace management, research and test ranges, and training and simulation.  We provide expertise capable of addressing complex programmatic issues including the management and coordination within and between organizations.  As such we have demonstrated our ability to provide staff with unique skills consisting of managers, engineers, analysts, subject matter experts, and operational staff.  While a relatively new corporate entity, we have more than three decades of expertise serving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DOD), and private industry.    We are a participants in the Small Business Administration 8(a) Business Development Program and are a Center for Veterans Enterprise (CVE) certified Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB).

 

 

February 22, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), aviation engineering, engineering services, professional services, SDB, SDVOSB | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Clancy JG Engineering and Consulting Services SDVOSB, SBA, 8a certified

The Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) was established in Washington, D.C. in 1956 by a group of air traffic controllers, the Air Traffic Control Association has been from the outset dedicated to progress in the science of air traffic control and the preservation of a safe flight environment. For more information visithttp://www.atca.org/

The Southwest Defense Alliance (SWDA) is a public benefit corporation formed in 1997, works to preserve and enhance critical defense missions and assets in the southwest United States. For more information visit http://www.swda.us/

The International Foundation for Telemetering (IFT) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to serving the professional and technical interests of the “Telemetering Community.” For more information visit http://www.telemetry.org/

The International Technology Education Association (ITEA) is the professional organization for technology, innovation, design, and engineering educators. Our mission is to promote technological literacy for all by supporting the teaching of technology and promoting the professionalism of those engaged in these pursuits. ITEA strengthens the profession through leadership, professional development, membership services, publications, and classroom activities. For more information visit http://www.itea.org

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) is the world’s largest professional society devoted to the progress of engineering and science in aviation, space, and defense. The Institute continues to be the principal voice, information resource, and publisher for aerospace engineers, scientists, managers, policymakers, students, and educators. AIAA is also the go-to resource for stimulating professional accomplishment and standards-driven excellence in all areas of aerospace for prominent corporations and government organizations worldwide. For more information visit http://www.aiaa.org/

The Society of Experimental Test Pilots (SETP) is an international organization that seeks to promote air safety and contributes to aeronautical advancement by promoting sound aeronautical design and development; interchanging ideas, thoughts and suggestions of the members, assisting in the professional development of experimental pilots, and providing scholarships and aid to members and the families of deceased members. For more information visit http://www.setp.org/

February 16, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), engineering services, professional services, SDB, SDVOSB | , , , , | Leave a comment

Comprehensive management, engineering and technical support services.

May 14, 2010 – ClancyJG International is certified by the Small Business Administration (SBA) as an 8(a) Business Development Program Participant. September 24, 2009 – ClancyJG International is awarded a contract by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to provide support to the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Office. As the support contractor, ClancyJG International provides the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) expert technical, analytical, and planning support services. September 15, 2009 – ClancyJG International, as a member of the Management and Engineering Technologies International Inc. (METI) Team, is please to announce that our Team has been selected as one of the successful offerors to participate in the Electronic FAA Accelerated and Simplified Tasks (eFAST). The FAA entered into multiple Master Ordering Agreements (MOAs) with Small Businesses, 8(a), Women-Owned, Socially and Economically Disadvantaged Businesses (SEDB) to provide comprehensive management, engineering and technical support services.

Thank you for your interest in ClancyJG International. For information please use any of the contact options stated below with your contact information and a brief description of your need. We look forward to quickly responding to your inquiry.

Corporate:  (661) 339-3120  FAX: (661) 339-3126

John Clancy, President: jclancy@clancyjg.com 661.886.2166

Donald C. Rhea, Vice President: drhea@clancyjg.com 661.886.8557

To submit a resume select

resume@clancyjg.com

 

February 8, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), engineering services, professional services, SDB, SDVOSB | , , , , | Leave a comment

ClancyJG International – Engineering, Professional and Consulting Services

 

Here is an example of our success.  ClancyJG International is the current provider of Air Traffic Control and Aviation Safety Subject Matter Experts to the HQ FAAAJV-13, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Group in Washington, DC since September 2009.  In this capacity we have demonstrated:
  • Our ability to compete and perform as a Government Prime Contractor
  • Our ability to provided a competitive and compliant approach to meeting customer requirements
  • Our ability to rapidly transition uniquely and highly qualified incumbent technical staff
  • Our ability to recruit and retain new staff to fill key personnel incumbent staff vacancies
  • Our ability to properly manage and execute a prime contract ensuring proper programmatic oversight

Our staff consists of Executive Managers, Program Managers, Project Managers,Engineers, Analysts, Subject Matter Experts, Technical Experts, Security Experts, and Operations Professionals. We actively recruit staff with many years of experience and a demonstrated set of skills. Many staff members have recently retired from the Federal Government, Military, and Private Sector and are searching for exciting opportunities to use their talents. We are prepared to provide immediate support and look for opportunities that challenge our team and seem Insurmountable by our customers.

Federal Government Services as a Prime Contractor, Subcontractor, and Team Member

Currently supporting the FAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Office in Washington, DC (Prime Contract)

A Member of the METI Team for the Electronic FAA Accelerated and Simplified Tasks Master Ordering Agreement (eFAST MOA) www.faa.gov/go/efast

Responsive in providing a technically compliant approach to statement of work requirements with qualified staff and key personnel

Efforts focused on the defined NAICS Codes across all Government agencies and geographic locations

Commercial Consulting

Customers include Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, SERCO, Gallium Visual Systems, All Weather Inc, and Lockheed Martin Corporate

A diverse collection of pre-qualified staff with immediate availability to:

    • Augment your management team
    • Assess organizational inefficiencies
    • Address technical challenges
    • Analyze approaches and provide recommendations
    • Expedite coordination with external participants
    • Evaluate proposals for solicitation compliance
    • Fill a temporary staffing shortfall

February 1, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), engineering services, professional services, SDB, SDVOSB | , , , , | Leave a comment

Clany JG Engineering and Consulting Services SDVOSB, SBA, 8a certified

ClancyJG International is an professional, engineering, and consulting services company.  We are recognized experts in air traffic control and airspace management, research and test ranges, and training and simulation.  We provide expertise capable of addressing complex programmatic issues including the management and coordination within and between organizations.  As such we have demonstrated our ability to provide staff with unique skills consisting of managers, engineers, analysts, subject matter experts, and operational staff.  While a relatively new corporate entity, we have more than three decades of expertise serving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DOD), and private industry.    We are a participants in the Small Business Administration 8(a) Business Development Program and are a Center for Veterans Enterprise (CVE) certified Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB).

January 29, 2011 Posted by | 8(a), aviation engineering, engineering services, professional services, SDB, SDVOSB | , , , , , | Leave a comment